Getting things done – St Peter Street

Following complaints from residents and St Peter’s Free Church that the shrubbery at the north end of St Peter Street beside Hawkhill is overgrown and unsightly, I took the matter up with the Environment Department of Dundee City Council who responded positively as follows :
 
“(We agree) that the shrub bed is overgrown and dated.   We will look to carry out the removal of the shrubs over the next month or so and take it from there.   The likelihood is we will replant but will low level shrubs.”

Photopolis : Perth Road at St Peter Street

This Photopolis photograph (below) shows Perth Road at St Peter Street.    
 
It shows the north side of Perth Road running eastwards to the right towards the city centre, with St Peter Street leading north to the left.
 
Alexander Sutton, The West End Supply Stores, was at No. 121 Perth Street. Notice the peculiar barrow in St Peter Street. Sutton lived at No. 4 Gowrie Street. The confectioner at No. 199 was David Kermack. No. 117 was George Pickles’ West End Hosiery.
 
Alexander Thompson Watt at No. 115 was a butcher, with other shops at No. 4 Wellgate, No. 30 Victoria Road, No. 112 Ann Street and No. 40 Overgate. 
 
The tailor / clothier at No. 113 was George Pullar, and the bootmaker at No. 111 was David Fairweather.

Photopolis : Perth Road at St Peter Street

This Photopolis photograph shows Perth Road at St Peter Street.    
 
It shows the north side of Perth Road running eastwards to the right towards the city centre, with St Peter Street leading north to the left.
 
Alexander Sutton, The West End Supply Stores, was at No. 121 Perth Street. Notice the peculiar barrow in St Peter Street. Sutton lived at No. 4 Gowrie Street. The confectioner at No. 199 was David Kermack. No. 117 was George Pickles’ West End Hosiery.
 
Alexander Thompson Watt at No. 115 was a butcher, with other shops at No. 4 Wellgate, No. 30 Victoria Road, No. 112 Ann Street and No. 40 Overgate. The tailor / clothier at No. 113 was George Pullar, and the bootmaker at No. 111 was David Fairweather.

Parking at Ryehill Health Centre

Some years ago, I had a very useful meeting with Dr MacCowan of the Ryehill Health Centre and with the then Head of Environmental Management at NHS Tayside, regarding the health centre’s car park (see below).
The meeting resulted in a helpful arrangement where, although the car park is rightly barriered during health centre opening times to ensure it can only be used by patients and staff, the barriers are left up in the evenings and at weekends – a great help to local residents and parishioners of St Peter’s Free Church in an area of the West End where parking can be a real difficulty.
 
Following concerns raised with me recently that the NHS may be reviewing this arrangement, I contacted both Dr MacCowan and NHS Management and I am pleased to say that the arrangement will continue.   NHS Tayside’s Support Services Manager has advised that although a new barrier is in place, it will be programmed to be left in the raised position during times the centre is closed.
 
I am very grateful to Dr MacCowan and NHS Tayside for the very prompt response to my enquiry on this matter.

Mural – St Peter Street

The striking and unique mural on the side of the most northerly tenement in St Peter Street (pictured right) has been in place since 1982.    Residents have said to me that it might be needing a repaint as it has begun to fade over the years.
 
The City Council’s planning officer who deals with public art has advised me:
 
“The mural is now over 30 years old which is very unusual for a mural of this type.   The mural was carried by a group called Artists Collective in 1982.   The artists worked with the children of Blackness Primary School who were involved in a Dundee history project.   The Gable at that time needed a lot of repair and therefore the mural costs (funded by SDA) such as the scaffolding costs were shared with the repair budget.   
 
I have not seen the mural close up for some time so unaware of any recent problems.   Though the mural has faded in its brightness, it is still appears to be reasonably strong and readable.  Unless the paint is showing signs deterioration and peeling off then it is better to leave it alone. 
To refresh the whole surface with new paint we should consider a budget of well over £25k. 
I will go and have a look at the gable, but if the paint is still sound I would probably recommend little to no action at this time.”