Conclusion to Photopolis series : Hawkhill

The photograph below, concluding this series of the Photopolis photographic resource, shows the north side of the Hawkhill at the junction with Bellfield Lane at the left (in the west).
 
Alexander Wilson’s Dining Rooms and Coffeehouse were at No. 167. One of the advertisements on the gable end are for the Dundee Select Choir’s performance of Handel’s oratorio “Samson” at the Kinnaird Hall.
 
The Dundee Directory lists the other shops as Mrs G. Harper, tobacconist, Mrs A. Boyack, draper, The Annandale Dairy Company, Isabella Miller, fruiterer, and Miss F. Sheriff, confectioner. Then comes Lowden’s Alley.

Photopolis : Session Street

The original caption is misleading, as the photograph shows Dundee’s Scouringburn, whose layout was incorporated into the new Hawkhill section of the city’s inner ring road system in the 1970s, here seen leading westwards, Session Street to the right.
 
Mrs J. McManus, the general dealer, is first listed at No. 13 Scouringburn in the Dundee Directory for 1888-89. The 1893-94 edition has John Finnigan as the owner of the public house at No. 15, the Celtic Bar.
 
James P. Casey is described there as ‘dealer in furniture, left-off clothing, antiquarian and general bookseller, and licensed broker’. Their advertisement says Mr and Mrs Casey will pay good prices in cash for any part of anyone’s ‘superfluous wardrobe’.

Photopolis : Nethergate

This photograph of the north side of Dundee’s Nethergate at the junction with Tay Street Lane (below) dates from after 1891, after which point numbers in that section were altered after extensive building works. The image may date from shortly afterwards.
 
As there are no names on any of the shops, it is difficult to date the picture with any greater accuracy. The low building at the right hand side (and east) housed the galleries of J. Gonnella & Co., a family of Italian sculptors, several of them consuls.
 
The corner establishment was the wine and spirits business belonging to Peter Fenwick. Before 1891, he was listed at No. 97. Afterwards, it was No.103, although not long afterwards, No. 105a (a confectionery owned by A. C. Davidson) was added.

Photopolis : Tay Square

Tay Square is the present-day location of The Rep theatre. It stands to the west of South Tay Street, which runs north from Nethergate to the junction with Overgate to the east and West Port to the west.
 
It is impossible to date this photograph below by Alexander Wilson as not only are there no visible names, but there was very little change of ownership over a considerable time span anyway. No 9. (the house behind the central tree!) was home to James H. Laing. 
 
No. 10 belonged to David Ogilvy, tailor, and No. 11 is listed in the Dundee Directory as Peter Steven FRCSE, a surgeon. The photographer set up in front of Tay Square United Free Church (ministered to by Rev. Robert Lang), looking north.

Photopolis : Logie House

The manor house of Logie (below) was apparently in existence prior to 1660, but from 1722-78 extensive alterations were carried out.   The building was demolished in 1908.    
 
Cleghorn Street was named after William Cleghorn, manufacturer, who long occupied Logie House as tenant, and afterwards became proprietor of the estate of Logie. 
 
Following the removal of Logie House, tenements were erected on the most of the lands.

Photopolis : Blackness House

Blackness House (below) was a picturesque 17th century mansion, demolished before World War II. It is shown on Ordnance Survey maps of the periods in extensive grounds, and a bowling green to the south side, the North Lodge House being on Blackness Road.
 
In 1867, J. B. Brechin published a list of paintings by the old masters in the Blackness House Gallery, which included Giotto, Bruegel, Gainsborough, Rembrandt, Raphael, Rubens and Titian.
 
In 1894, when Alexander Wilson took this photograph, Blackness House belonged to John E. Prain, listed in the Dundee Directory as a manufacturer. James Prain and Sons, spinners and manufacturers, owned Larchfield Works in Walton Street.

Photopolis : Perth Road at Invercauld Place

This photograph below shows part of Dundee’s Perth Road, known as Invercauld Place, here leading eastwards towards the city centre.
 
No. 153 was Sarah Campbell, a fruiterer, and No. 151 John Farquharson & Sons, ‘plumber, gasfitter, tinsmith & brassfounder’. George Christe, a grocer, had a shop at No. 149, and another fruiterer was at No. 145, John (later Mrs John) Peebles.
 
No. 143 was the grocer, David (later Mrs David) Sewart and, beyond Pennycook Lane, which led northwards to Hawkhill, was a butcher shop, which was probably what is listed in the Dundee Directory as John Birse, flesher, at No. 133.

Photopolis : Windsor Terrace

This latest photograph of this short series of West End historical photographs (below) is of Perth Road.   Although “Perth Road” is absolutely correct, residents of this section of the north side of Dundee’s Perth Road preferred to have their mail addressed to Windsor Terrace.
 
Residents of the block in 1895 included David Dewar, the superintendent of police, James Walker, Professor of Chemistry and University College, George Haggart, a solicitor, and John B. Hay, a builder.
 
In 1905, three were still there: Haggart had been replaced by Henry William Rennie, a merchant. Mrs James Burdon [sic], a spirit merchant in 1895, has been replaced by Duncan Macnab Burden, a solicitor, at No. 2 by 1905.

Photopolis : Hawkhill, taken from West Port

This view of the Hawkhill in Dundee below was taken from the West Port, looking west.
 
Thomas Aitken’s public house, The Globe, is listed in the Dundee Directory as Nos. 57 and 59 West Port, and is still so named today. Behind it is Johnston’s Lane.
 
No. 1 Hawkhill is listed in the Dundee Directory as John Mathieson, broker, which may have been the West Port Loans Office. M. Boland & Co.’s clothiery was Nos. 20 and 24 Hawkhill.

Photopolis : Perth Road at St Peter Street

This Photopolis photograph (below) shows Perth Road at St Peter Street.    
 
It shows the north side of Perth Road running eastwards to the right towards the city centre, with St Peter Street leading north to the left.
 
Alexander Sutton, The West End Supply Stores, was at No. 121 Perth Street. Notice the peculiar barrow in St Peter Street. Sutton lived at No. 4 Gowrie Street. The confectioner at No. 199 was David Kermack. No. 117 was George Pickles’ West End Hosiery.
 
Alexander Thompson Watt at No. 115 was a butcher, with other shops at No. 4 Wellgate, No. 30 Victoria Road, No. 112 Ann Street and No. 40 Overgate. 
 
The tailor / clothier at No. 113 was George Pullar, and the bootmaker at No. 111 was David Fairweather.

Photopolis : Perth Road at Springfield

This undated photograph below shows the north side of Perth Road, Dundee, looking west and left from the south end of Springfield.
 
The hairdressing and shampooing rooms at No. 37 belonged to John Fisher & Son, listed as ‘hairdresser and perfumer’ specialising in ornamental hair. He lived at No. 56 Magdalen Yard Road. No. 41 was William Moffatt, bookseller, stationer and tobacconist.
 
Nos. 43 Perth Road was Mrs J. M. Robertson’s West End Livery Stables, listed in the Dundee Directory as Nos. 45 and 57 too. She lived at No. 1 Strawberrybank. The company stables were at No. 32.5 King Street. D. D. Robertson lived at No. 45 Perth Road.

Photopolis : Living and Working in Dundee 1900–1925

Photopolis is a major photographic resource in Dundee City Council’s ownership that I have, with the permission of the Communities Division of the council, featured photographs from in the past.
 
It consists of a significant selection of quality photographs from various collections in the Central Library and the City Archives that can be accessed via the City Council’s website, allowing easy access to large numbers of historical photographs.
 
By popular request, during this month, I’ll again feature some of the superb West End photos on Photopolis. 
 
As a start, pictured below is Grosvenor Terrace – 307-313 Perth Road – and to quote Photopolis :
 
“The residents in 1889 included the principal of University College, William Peterson MA, LLD, William K. Bruce, a confectioner who worked for the famed Dundee firm, Keillor & Sons, and W. A. Brown, of whom nothing further is known.
 
No. 1 was the home of Alexander M. Grimond of the jute spinners J. & A. D. Grimond, of Bowbridge and Maxwelltown Works, with offices in King Street, and great uncles of the prominent Liberal politician, Jo Grimond.”

Iain Flett, City Archivist

Today marks the retirement, after over 40 years of service, of Iain Flett, the City Archivist.
 
Many constituents will know Iain, who has provided a superb archives service for the city, along with his former assistant Richard Cullen and his current assistant Martin Allan.   Martin will now take on the role of City Archivist on Iain’s retirement.
 
Iain has been extremely helpful to me over the years in providing feedback to the many constituent enquiries received about the city’s history and he is hugely knowledgeable as well as an accomplished, informative and entertaining public speaker.   
 
Earlier this week, Iain and Martin undertook a really interesting presentation to councillors and senior council officers on the archives – see photo below, with thanks to Councillor Jimmy Black for the photo.
 
I wish Iain a very long and happy retirement.

Conclusion to Photopolis series : Hawkhill

The photograph below, concluding this series of the Photopolis photographic resource, shows the north side of the Hawkhill at the junction with Bellfield Lane at the left (in the west).
 
Alexander Wilson’s Dining Rooms and Coffeehouse were at No. 167. One of the advertisements on the gable end are for the Dundee Select Choir’s performance of Handel’s oratorio “Samson” at the Kinnaird Hall.
 
The Dundee Directory lists the other shops as Mrs G. Harper, tobacconist, Mrs A. Boyack, draper, The Annandale Dairy Company, Isabella Miller, fruiterer, and Miss F. Sheriff, confectioner. Then comes Lowden’s Alley.

Photopolis : Overgate

The photograph below shows the east end of Dundee’s Overgate, where it merges with the High Street, with the Town House (on the south side of High Street) just visible behind the hanging sign to the right.
 
David McLeod the bootmaker was at No. 41 Overgate, James R Butchart, a basket manufacturer, at No. 37, the smallware merchant Paul Kane at No. 33 and the Dundee Equitable Boot Depot at No. 29, although it is not listed in the Dundee Directory.
 
No. 23 was Robert Methven, a spirit dealer. The clocks are possibly part of a display by Herbert J. Cohen the jeweller’s display (at The Golden Locket) at No. 15, and the Foreign and British Emporium was nextdoor to J. & J. Fleming’s jeweller’s shop.

Photopolis : Reform Street

The photograph below shows the junction of Reform Street, here seen running northwards to the High School, and Bank Street, which runs westwards, parallel to the Overgate, towards Barrack Street.
 
The pianoforte & music saloons, ‘sole agents in Scotland’ for Bechstein and Steinway, were Paterson, Sons & Co. Pricelists in Dundee Central Library’s Lamb Collection (Box 29(19)) list other stores in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Ayr and Dumfries.
 
Next door at numbers 42-46 were the clothiers and men’s mercers, J. D. Adams & Company. No. 48 were the bootmakers, Miller & Smith. Alexander Miller lived at Edenbank, Downfield, a village at that time on the north western edge of the city.

Photopolis : Dock Street

The photograph below shows the western end of Dundee’s Dock Street, with the Greenmarket to the right and east, and Dundee West Railway Station to the left.
 
The rear of Gilfillan Memorial Church is impressive to the left, while nextdoor is the ‘public warehouse’, which was occupied by various salt merchants and fruiterers. Around the corner is ‘The Weigh House’, another salt store.
 
Among the salt merchants, the Cowan family were pre-eminent. Members of the dynasty included George C.’s brother, Edward, who was Town Clerk of Broughty Ferry, and his father, James, who was a harbour trustee and member of Dundee Council from 1877-1982.

Photopolis : Seagate

The photograph below shows the corner of Dundee’s Seagate running from west to east left to right and St Andrews Street leading northwards at the righthand side.   The area was cleared for St Andrews Buildings, which bear an inscription dated 1894.
 
The corner building here housed John D. Bruce, solicitor, and John Findlay jun., a house-agent who lived at Floralbank in Broughty Ferry. Nextdoor, at No. 114 was the saddler, Robert Sim, who lived at No. 112. J. Hendry is listed there in 1891-92.
 
No. 108 was occupied by Fairweather and Sons, tobacco manufacturers, George Livie, boatbuilders, and the home of Joseph Jaffrey, broker, whose business premises were at No. 146 Seagate.

Photopolis : City Churches

The Alexander Wilson photograph below shows the eastern portion of Dundee’s City Churches, with the south at the centre, the Steeple to the west and left, the east at the right.
 
The Mercat Cross (a 16th-century column surmounted by a replica of Scott Sutherland’s Unicorn) stands inside the railings.   Today it is slightly further west, midway between the Old Steeple and the current Overgate shopping centre.
 
The carriages are at a ‘cab stance’ (the precursor of the taxi rank), which started at the north end of Union Street (which led south to Tay Bridge and Dundee West railway stations).   Fares were in units of sixpence, varying by zone.

Photopolis : Meadowside and Euclid Crescent

The photograph below shows the Post Office which stood at the junctions of Dundee’s Meadowside and Euclid Crescent, with the fence and bushes in the grounds of Dundee High School to the right.
 
The postmaster in 1902, shortly before the area was redeveloped for D. C. Thomson to plans by to plans by Niven & Wigglesworth, a London company, was George H. Gibb, who lived at Hermonhill in Perth Road.
 
On weekdays the office was open from 6.45am until 9pm, with the sale of stamps continuing until 11pm.   In its role as a savings bank, business was carried out between 9am and 6pm.    Postal business was also available on Sundays from 9.30am -10.45am.

Photopolis : High Street

D.M.Brown’s department store in the High Street (below) was a landmark for many generations of Dundee’s citizens. 
 
David Millar Brown the son of a Lochee coal merchant served his apprenticeship as a draper with various Lochee and Dundee shops.
 
D.M.Brown set us his own business at the age of 24 employing 3 people. The business was so successful that by 1938 D.M.Brown employed 400 people.

Photopolis : Cowgate

The photograph below – strictly speaking – shows St Andrews Place, Dundee, where Cowgate and King Street meet; the trees behind the wall with railings are in the grounds of St Andrew’s Church.
 
Fleming Brothers’ City Clothing Warehouse at No. 16 dominates the corner of the scene, nextdoor to David McLardy & Co.’s domestic machinery warehouse. Fleming Brothers also had a Household Furnishing Co. at No. 15 and another shop in Lochee High Street.
 
McLardy’s advertisement in the 1904-05 Dundee Directory lists mangels, wringers, sewing machines, etc., ice cream freezers and all kinds of household furniture, and drapery and boots – in other words, they sold just about every for the home.

Photopolis : Dundee West Station

Although, to date, I have featured West End Photopolis photographs, I’ll now feature some City Centre ones.   This Alexander Wilson photograph – below – shows the Dundee West Station (the third building on that site) with its distinctive clock tower in red sandstone. The goods yard stood to the south of the main station.
 
To the right of the picture is Mathers’ Commercial Hotel, Whitehall Place, built in 1898 to plans by Robert Hunter.    Previously Mathers had had a temperance hotel in Whitehall Street, but increased trade required a bigger building.
 
The Caledonian Railway’s carting department was run by Wordie and Co., who were also agents for the Dundee and Arbroath Joint Railway at Dundee East, and the London and North Western Railway at Dundee West.